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2 November 2006 (VOL 4 WEEK 44)

National Chaplaincy for Deaf People Job Vacancy NCDP providing Pastoral Care for Deaf People throughout Ireland are now recruiting two people to be Lay Chaplain for the West (Office in Galway) and North (Office in Belfast) of Ireland. Salary €32,000. This is a 1 year fixed term contract. The ideal candidate will have: knowledge and experience of Deaf Culture, a good fluency of ISL (BSL for North of Ireland), pastoral experience, a relevant qualification or equivalent. Further information / job description is available from Mary ph: 01-8305744, email: office@ncdp.ie or www.ncdp.ie. Cover letter, C.V. and max. one page on why you want this job to be sent by 5pm, Friday, 17th November 06 to: Fr. Joe Jones, Director of the NCDP, 40 Lower Drumcondra Rd, Dublin 9.

United Nations In the Irish Deaf News (IDN) edition Issue 5, there was a very informative article on the United Nations treaty on recognising Deaf human rights. On August 25th, the UN finally agreed on the text of a new treaty on the rights of persons with disabilities. The treaty is the first human rights treaty of the 21st century. It is expected to be adopted by the UN before the end of the year.

The vote to adopt the convention represents a truly historical moment to Deaf people because the text supports the recognition of sign language, Deaf culture, linguistic and cultural identity, education in sign language, sign language interpreting and the acceptance of the use of sign language in public places.

The Irish Deaf Society and the World Federation of the Deaf will work closely to ensure the implementation of the convention into Irish law. If you would like more information on this historic development, you can read more in the Irish Deaf News (page 7). Copies available from our service.

Ladies Basketball celebrate 25 years The IDN also had an article on the St. Vincent's Deaf Ladies Basketball Club who celebrated their 25th anniversary over the summer. They celebrated with a commemorative basketball game, a photo exhibition and a wine and cheese exhibition. Our service would like to send our best wishes to the club and wishes them all the best for their next 25 years.

Mental Health Commission DVD A Sign Language DVD on the Mental Health Act 2001 has been launched recently. The DVD has been produced as an aid to widen the audience base who may wish to be provided with information on the Mental Health Act 2001. If you would like to view this DVD, please contact us and we will a room and DVD player. If you would like more information, check out www.mhcirl.ie or email: info@mhcirl.ie.

KDRC Christmas PartyOur annual Christmas party will be held in the Abbeygate Hotel on the 17th of December. We will have a four course meal, spot prizes and of course Santa. Tickets are available at a reduced price- they will cost €15 for adults and €10 for children. If you would like to attend, please contact us.

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9 November 2006 (VOL 4 WEEK 45)

Hello and welcome to our weekly notes. Monthly Mass Fr. Placid Nolan would like to inform you that our monthly mass for November is being held on the 26th of November. Our apologies for the short notice regarding the change of date.

Street Collections The Kerry Deaf Action Group is having a street collection on Thursday 9th and Friday 10th November. They are also organising a bag packing fundraiser at Tesco, Manor West, Tralee on Saturday 11th November. If anyone would like to assist with the collections contact DAG at 087 6645418 (text only) or email kdag2007@hotmail.com. Your support will be greatly appreciated.

Church Collections Our church gate collections take place on Saturday 18th and Sunday 19th November. We appreciate the work and support from our regular collectors and welcome any new people interested in helping out on the day. The churches allocated to us are Caherciveen, Filemore, Aghatubrid, Valentia, Portmagee, The Glen, Ballinskelligs, Killorglin, Glenflesk, Clonkeen, Cromane, Cloghane, Castlegregory, Ballylongford, Castleisland, Cordal, Listowel, Currans, Lixnaw, Knocknagoshel, Kenmare, Barraduff, sneem, Tahilla, Glenlough, Castlecove, Waterville, Caherdaniel, Asdee, Lohar, Dingle, Ventry, Dunquin, Annascaul, Inch, Lispole, Camp, Ballymaceligott, Clogher, Scartaglen, Templenoe, Bonane, Dawros, Irremore and Rathae. Please contact the Kerry Deaf Resource Centre if you are available to help out. The funds raised will go towards our Christmas Party and the overheads we will have over the year in running our service.

Christmas Party It is that time of year again, Christmas is just around the corner. Our Christmas party for our Deaf clients and their families will be held at the Abbeygate Hotel on Sunday 17th December from 2-6pm. If you would like to attend, please contact us.

Job Vacancy The National Chaplaincy for Deaf People are advertising two positions for Lay Chaplains. Further information/job description is available from Mary ph: 01-8305744, email: office@ncdp.ie or at www.ncdp.ie

Award for Student We would like to send our best wishes to Eimear who was on work experience with our service. She is being presented with a Gold Award from the President of Ireland and the Duke of Edinburgh in Edinburgh this week. Catherine White mentored her during her tasks for the award and was also lucky enough to be invited to the prestigious event, we hope both of them have a great time.

Staff Leaving We would like to send our thanks and best wishes to Catherine White and Bernadette O Connor who have worked for our service for many years. Catherine is relocating to the UK in December. Catherine co-ordinated our very successful EEI project and we would like to thank her for her tremendous work and huge achievements on the EEI project. Bernadette O Connor has worked with our service for three years and was a student on the EEI project, we would like to thank her most sincerely for her hard work and dedication to our service and clients. It is very difficult for services to secure funding to keep on staff. However, we would like to thank the Dept of Education and FAS for funding these positions over the past three years. Hopefully, if we secure funding in the future, we will be able to work with both Catherine and Bernadette again.

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16 November 2006 (VOL 4 WEEK 46)

Hello and welcome again to our weekly notes section.
NALA Awards Our EEI project won an award at the weekend at the ACE Awards sponsored by the Educational Building Society and hosted by NALA- The National Adult Literacy Agency. The prestigious event was held in the Westin Hotel in Dublin. Four representatives from our EEI project and our service attended the event and had a great night. The awards were for Adult Continuing Education. They celebrate good practice and the successful creation of high qualigy learning opportunities for adults. Our thanks to Michelle Anne Houlihan for nominating the project. It was a great honour especially for our students as they graduated from their training recently. Well done to all our students and to its Board and Co-ordinator.

Church Collections A huge thanks to all those who have agreed to fundraise on our behalf next week. We are extremely grateful for your support. By now you should have received your permit and posters. If not, please contact us immediately.

Street Collections Deaf Action Group (DAG) would like to thank all those who volunteered for the recent Street Collection in Tralee. As always the weather was bad in November so thank you to all those who braved the bad weather conditions.

CACDP Deafblind trainingG We would like to thank CACDP for providing our EEI students with Deafblind training over the weekend. This brings our training nearly to an end. All training will be completed before Christmas and this will bring an end to a very successful Education Equality Initiative training project. Further training will be provide if we can secure additional funding.

EEI National Network Meeting Lastly, representatives from our service attended the last national meeting for the EEI projects. The two day event was held in Dublin in The National College of Ireland. These meetings have been a fantastic opportunity for our EEI participants/ representatives to network with other EEI projects throughout Ireland. A huge thanks to Helen and Denise for all their support over the past 2 and a half years. They worked extremely has to ensure our project was well supported at all times.

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23 November 2006 (VOL 4 WEEK 47)

Monthly Mass Our monthly mass will be held this Sunday at 3pm in St. John's Pastoral Centre. Tea and Coffee will be served. An Interpreter will also be present. Our December Mass will be held on the same day as our Christmas Party on the 17th of December. Then in January, we will revert back to having the Mass on the 2nd Sunday of each month.

Dublin Theatre of the Deaf "Miracle on O' Connell Street" by Dominic Mc Greal will be held in the Dublin Deaf Association, 40 Drumcondra Road on the 23rd, 24th and 25th of November at 8pm. Admission is €10 for adults and €7.50 for students, OAP's and unemployed. Best wishes to everyone involved in the production.

Interpreting Services Report Launched The long awaited report on Sign Language Interpreting Services in Ireland was launched by Minister for Social and Family Affairs in Dublin during the week. A member of our service attended the launch. Our thanks to Comhairle and Prospectus for including our service when they were carrying our the review. The report focuses on a review of current service and an action plan for the next 6 years. A copy of the written report and a sign language version on CD is available from our service.

European Day of People with Disabilities December 4th is European Day of People with Disabilities. The Kerry Network of PWD's is marking the day with an event in Ballyroe Heights Hotel from 10.30am to 1pm with lunch afterwards. The theme of the morning is DisAbility in the Workplace through E Technology. If you would like to attend, please contact the Kerry Network. Their e-mail is kerrypwdi@eircom.net. If you have specific communication requirements, please inform the Network.

Use of non-qualified -v- Trained interpreters Mainstream service providers are becoming more aware of how to make their services accessible to Deaf and hard of hearing customers. Deaf people themselves are also becoming more aware of the availability of interpreters. However, a number of services are using non-trained and non-qualified interpreters. If you require interpreting services in Kerry, contact our service to source appropriately qualified interpreters. Nationally it has been agreed by all Deaf Service Providers that the use of non-trained non-qualified interpreters in all settings with particular emphasis on the Courts and Health settings is not permissible. More information about the use of interpreters can be obtained from our Centre.

Job Vacancy: Fulltime community co-ordinator in Limerick
Deaf Community Centre will be established very shortly In Limerick City. We are looking for a skilled person who would like the challenge to run the Centre and work with Deaf Community. This job is a full-time post and will be based mainly in Limerick City and cater for whole Mid West Region. Full-time Community Co-ordinator Requirement:
  • Familiar with MS Office or equivalent
  • Good communication and interpersonal skills
  • good Irish Sign Language skill
  • Good organisational skills
  • Adaptable, flexible and hard working
  • Driving Licence
Salary is negotiable and competitive. Full Job Description available on request by email to: deafcommunitycentre@yahoo.ie. Closing date for job application is 2.30pm on 15th December. Send CV with covering letter to Mary Kiely, C/o Limerick School for Deaf, Rosbrien, Limerick.

Launch of New Book covering History of the First School for the Deaf On 9 November, 2006, at the Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, "The Avenue" A History of the Claremont Institution, by Rachel Pollard, covering the history of the first ever school for the deaf in Ireland, was officially launched by the Minister for Education & Science, Mary Hanafin. The Avenue contains biographies of the founder, Dr Charles Orpen, (grand-uncle of the renowned artist, Sir William Orpen) and the first headmaster, a Quaker Joseph Humphrey's. Profiled were deaf individuals who contributed significantly to the temporal and spiritual well-being of the Deaf community during the 19th century and early 20th century. Copies of the book are available for €12 each from Kerry Deaf Resource Centre.

The Author ­ Rachel Pollard
Born in Dublin and graduate of the Open University with a degree in Social Sciences, she takes particular interest in local history and in Deaf education. Former administrator of the E.U.-funded Training Course in Adult and Community Education for Deaf Tutors at Maynooth University, member of the Establishment Group of People with Disabilities in Ireland, curriculum developer, teacher and examiner in course of Irish Sign Language, she contributed articles covering Irish Deaf History to various journals and workshops. After undertaking secondary education at St Mary’s School for Deaf Girls, Cabra, she made the distinction, in 1971, of being the first deaf person in Ireland to pass the Leaving Certificate.

On 9 November, 2006, at the Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, a book, The Avenue:
A History of the Claremont Institution, by Rachel Pollard, covering the history of the first ever school for the deaf in Ireland, was officially launched by the Minister for Education & Science, Mary Hanafin, T.D.

After its establishment in 1816 by the Cork-born doctor, Dr Charles Orpen, in a prison in Smithfield, Dublin, the school moved three years later to a larger premises in Glasnevin (still existing today as St Clare’s Home for the Elderly, Griffith Avenue, Dublin 9). After moving in 1943 to a smaller house in Monkstown, it closed down in 1978. According to the author, The Avenue should fill a gap in the literature covering the history of Deaf education in the Irish context, and it is noteworthy that this well-researched and extensively illustrated book is produced by a Deaf person. The Avenue contains biographies of the founder, Dr Charles Orpen, (grand-uncle of the renowned artist, Sir William Orpen) and the first headmaster ­ a Quaker - Joseph Humphreys. Profiled were deaf individuals who contributed significantly to the temporal and spiritual well-being of the Deaf community during the 19th century and early 20th century. Coverage was given to court cases involving deaf people, including a juror, using writing for communication, along with chapters on Deaf women, missionaries, teachers, artists and entrepreneurs. In the latter category was Reginald Ferguson Peacocke, nephew of one of the Church of Ireland Primate of Ireland, and he was the first Irish deaf person to fly solo an airplane in 1932 in Co. Sligo. One of the former pupils, having emigrated to Canada in the 1880s, was one of the ‘Deaf Homesteaders’ ­ similar to the pioneers of the ‘Wild West’ of the United States ­ before establishing a business in saddlery.

As well as providing education, the Claremont Institution was concerned with the employment of the deaf children afterwards in such as domestic service, millinery and/or factory work for the girls, and farming, shoemaking and printing for the boys. Some of the former pupils emigrated to England, America, Australia and Canada. In 1876 the Dublin Working Boys' Home (aka ‘The Harding’) was founded to provide accommodation for young men coming up to Dublin to work. A number of Claremont boys, on leaving school, went to live in the Harding Home. According to Ms Denise Ellis-King, board member of the Heritage Council and Dublin City Librarian, The Avenue ‘offers considerable research interest to students at all levels of the educational spectrum.’ At the launch were the Very Rev. Desmond Harman, Dean of Christ Church Cathedral, Fr. Joseph Jones, Director of National Chaplaincy to Deaf People, several members of the Deaf community, some former pupils of Claremont and some Harding ‘Old Boys’. On 10 November last, upon invitation by the organising committee of the Celebrations of the 100th anniversary of the Ulster Institute for the Adult Deaf in Belfast ­ where Francis Maginn, from Cork, was superintendent, Rachel Pollard gave an inspiring lecture on the Claremont Institution and its connection with Northern Ireland. The audience, numbering over 150, was captivated and filled with civic pride when Rachel announced that Belfast’s famous landmark ­ the City Hall ­ provided a source of employment for a former Claremont pupil at the ‘new City Hall’. In 1899, the jobless stonemason had walked, with wife and six children, all the way from Dublin to Belfast, where Maginn obtained lodgings for this family and a position for the father on the building site of the City Hall which is also celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

ENDS
Publisher: Denzille Press. ISBN 0-9553239-0-8, published November 2006. 344 pages, 190 illustrations, 170mm x 240mm, paperback.

Background Information:
A pioneering venture in the history of Irish education, the National Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb Poor of Ireland (commonly known as the Claremont Institution), was founded in 1816. Its founder, Dr Charles Orpen (1791-1856), was inspired by both educational and evangelical zeal, and he became the leader of the education of deaf children in Ireland.

Today Special Needs Education is in the forefront of Irish schools. The care and education of deaf children is a high priority and the integration of Special Education pupils into mainstream schools continues to gain support. It was not so two hundred years ago. Deaf children were neglected and were considered as 'mutes' and not capable of being educated. In the early nineteenth century a number of specialist institutions were founded, where deaf children could be housed and taught either 'sign language' or 'articulation' to enable them to communicate with the non-deaf. The Claremont Institution was such a school and it led the way in Ireland by developing methods and aids to assist deaf pupils to learn. It was a charitable institution, managed by the then Established Church (now Church of Ireland) and supported by voluntary subscriptions and serving deaf children from all parts of Ireland and abroad. Up to the 1860s, public examinations of the pupils were held annually in the Rotunda Round Room in Dublin to demonstrate the success of the school and to collect further funding.

Charles Orpen was a medical doctor and, prior to the opening of the Claremont Institution, he had travelled widely in Europe visiting similar institutions. He was particularly impressed by the work of Abbé Sicard, head of the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb in Paris and author of Cours d' Instruction du Sourd-Muet de Naissance, a book widely used during the early years of Claremont. Orpen also visited institutions in Switzerland and Italy where the method of 'articulation' (learning to speak) was preferred to sign language, so that the pupils would be able to communicate in the wider world and not just with other deaf persons who were familiar with sign language. Orpen also was much influenced by the educational ideas of the famous Swiss educator, Pestalozzi (1746-1827), who was a pioneer of 'child-centred' education, based on the observation and experience of the children. John Synge of Glanmore Castle, Co Wicklow, a close friend of Orpen, was also a devotee of Pestalozzi and he published Pestalozzian educational charts for use in Ireland.

Joseph Humphreys, a Quaker and the first headmaster of Claremont, was involved in the work of the Kildare Place Society, another pioneering Irish educational venture, which supported schools, printed textbooks and trained teachers in the new monitorial system of Joseph Lancaster of London (1778-1838). Thus in the early nineteenth century, educational ideas in Ireland were part of a broad European network and the Claremont Institution was the fourth deaf school of its kind in the British Isles - the others being in London, Edinburgh and Birmingham.

As well as providing primary education, the Claremont Institution was concerned with the employment of the deaf children afterwards in such as domestic service, millinery and/or factory work for the girls, and farming, shoemaking and printing for the boys. In 1876 the Dublin Working Boys' Home was founded to provide accommodation for young men coming up to Dublin to work and in 1889 Miss Harding left a legacy to provide a technical school attached to the Home. A number of deaf boys, on leaving Claremont, went to live in the Harding Home and a chapter in the book traces its history. Another area where boys were encouraged to work was to become missionaries to the deaf at home and abroad as 'messengers of the Gospel'. The Dublin Protestant Deaf and Dumb Association held evangelical religious services using sign language, and it published a journal, The Irish Deaf-Mute Advocate and Juvenile Instructor.

The Claremont Institution was situated in Glasnevin in a fine purpose-built house (now St. Clare’s Home for the Elderly, Griffith Avenue), approached by a long avenue - hence the title of the book. Although it was well known in the area, it has been part of what the author calls the 'hidden history' of Ireland. Using the extensive records of the school, which are deposited in the National Archives, Rachel Pollard has produced a valuable historical study. The book gives not only an account of the life and work of the Claremont Institution itself, but also places the education of the deaf in the context of the history of Irish education. The book includes personal memoirs of past pupils and a range of contemporary illustrations.

In 1943 the school moved to smaller premises in Monkstown and finally closed in 1978. However, with the support of the Claremont Trust and the Heritage Council, this book has brought back to life the remarkable story of one man's vision and of his pioneer work that brought education and self esteem to 'the children of silence'.

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30 November 2006 (VOL 4 WEEK 48)

EEI Management Meeting The last meeting of our EEI Project will be held on the 4th of December in our office in Tralee. This will be followed by a lunch for Board members. It will also mark the completion of the project. The project was very successful. A huge thanks to all those involved in the project especially Catherine White, the Management Committee and mostly to the 18 Deaf students.

Job Vacancy: Manager Required Sign Language Interpreter Service The Sign Language Interpreter Service (SLIS) is a new independent body being established by a Steering Group set up by Comhairle to develop, promote and deliver quality sign language interpretation services to the Deaf community in Ireland, including face to face and remote services. The Steering Group is now seeking to fill the key position of Manager, Sign Language Interpreter Service. Knowledge of Irish Sign Language and interpreting issues. Experience of managing and developing a booking service would also be an advantage. Salary scale: €55,322 to €69,370. This is a full-time and permanent position. If you would like to know more, please contact: Sean McDonagh 01 632 1836 or e-mail sean.mcdonagh@hrm.ie Website www.hrm.ie

Job Vacancy: Full-time Community Co-ordinator Required Full-time Community Co-ordinator position available for Deaf Community Centre will be established very shortly In Limerick City. They are looking for a skilled person who would like the challenge to run the Centre and work with Deaf Community. This job is a full-time post and will be based mainly in Limerick City and cater for whole Mid West Region.
Closing date for job application is 2.30pm on 15th December. Salary is negotiable and competitive. Send CV with covering letter to Mary Kiely, C/o Limerick School for Deaf, Rosbrien, Limerick. Full Job Description available on request by email to deafcommunitycentre@yahoo.ie

IDWG/IDS/MSDP Presents Santa The Irish Deaf Women's Group in conjunction with the Irish Deaf Society and the Model School for the Deaf Project presents Santa at the Drama room in the Dublin Deaf club. Sunday 3rd December 2006 Time- 3.30pm after the family mass at 2:30pm Cost: €5 per family (members) 10euro per family (non members). Numbers are limited. For Santa’s present - please put children’s name and age (under 10’s only). Contact IDWG for more information: Text: 086 1719570, Email: idwg@irishdeafsociety.ie Fax: 01 860 1986.

IDYA New Year's Eve Party Irish Deaf Youth Association are holding a ‘James Bond’ themed New Year’s Eve party this year. Where: The Lesson Hotel, 26/27 Lesson Street, Dublin 2. Its on 31st December 2006 Cost: If you pay for tickets by 29th December, tickets will cost E20. Bought on the night will cost you €30. Email IDYA for more information at info@irishdeafyouth.com
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